The Only Person You Have To Answer To & Please...

David Goggins could be thought of as superhuman. He’s a 20year armed forces veteran, completing the infamous hell week three times… he’s held the world record for the most pull-ups completed in 24hrs at 4,030… he’s run more than 50 endurance races, including 8 consecutive 100 mile races over 8 back to back weekends… and he’s run the equivalence of 267 marathons in a single year… and twice in his life he’s found himself weighing over 130kg’s… and in his youth had a congenital disease that left him with a hole in his heart...
 

Running - The Youth Academy

Goggins has a few ideologies that are all powerful lessons for young athletes to learn…

  • being the very best is NOT being #1…. being the very best is leaving everything that you have out there on the field… being able to walk away knowing you gave it your all
  • there is no competition, except for yourself… that’s who you’re “competing” with…

But there’s one that sticks out high above the rest. One that, especially for young athletes and adolescents, will have immense power in shaping their identity and developing their character… and it stems from Goggins’ time in high school

On the Impact Theory podcast, he describes this time where he achieved the most growth and challenged himself the most too… 

He caught himself wanting to please others. He wanted to fit in. He wanted to sit at the “cool table” and to do so, he was developing different and inauthentic identities just so he could please others… he was becoming their captive

But here’s the thing… the only person you need to answer to, the only one you truly need to make happy, is the one who stares you back in the mirror - and this is an all powerful, yet challenging, concept to grasp

Accept Yourself - The Youth Academy

Goggins’ did this. He caught himself, and went and sat at his own table… alone. and the funniest thing of all… people began to come and sit with him. there were others at school like him, struggling with the same challenges, and they resonated with him…

He accepted himself. he was authentic to himself. and people resonate with that

How much do you do to impress other people… how much to you change yourself to get others to like you? love and feelings of being “accepted” and a part of something are intoxicating - but not at the expense of your freedom

For if you’re doing something for other people, or so that they’ll like you - in essence, you’re their captive… and that’s not being free or true to yourself

Nick Maier