064 - the feedback loop of one of the greatest investors we've ever seen...


I like to believe there's a commonality between each and every single one of us. A set of principles that we can all abide by and apply to our own lives in a way that suits the "game" we're playing. And when you begin to research and delve into the lives of the greats who have come before us, these patterns and principles begin to emerge

And they're a heck of a lot simpler than you might think...

I've recently come across one of these patterns again in Ray Dalio's book "Principles" - where he discuss and shares his concept for rapid learning and growth in his life and business

bridgewater-ray-dalio-principles-squiggle-graph.jpg

On a macro scale (i.e. long timeline), it looks like this:

1_NAJVI8y35lNvv_IhlVDYWw.png

And when you break each loop down, it looks like this...

What we discover here is Dalio's acceptance and relationship with failure and mistakes, and how he uses those periods to his advantage. These mistakes are always going to be present in life, and it's what you do with the information they provide you with that matters most - we learn from them and improve upon them to reach a higher level

And it shows in his culture at his business, Bridgewater, whereby they have a unique transparent culture where all mistakes are brought to attention so that they can be dealt with and learnt from. Nobody is reprimanded for making mistakes, instead, they're encouraged. The only time you'd get in trouble is from hiding them

Maybe this is something we can all learn from...

It's the same pattern we see from Tony Robbins' massive action cycle, and it's the same advice passed down by many highly successful people and professional athletes about how to view and deal with these hard times in life

Regardless of what you call it or how you view it, there's really only one true way to view and deal with failure, and your relationship with it can & probably will either make or break you

With this new concept and thought pattern in mind, would it not seem smart to try and bring about a mistake as quickly as possible once a higher level has been reached? As it always seems that mistakes are a stepping stone to going higher again as we need to push that envelope...


Actionable Tip + Questions:

  • Do I hide my mistakes and shy away from pushing for a new level due to a fear of failing and what that might make me?
  • How is my relationship with mistakes and failure? Do I think they define me and make me less of a person for making them, or do I know they're an essential part of success and me becoming the person and athlete I aspire to become...
Nick Maier